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Any H11 LED head light bulb will fit. Just make sure it comes with the load balancing harness or the LED will trip a fault in the computer software system.

The problem with LED's in halogen jeweled reflectors is that they are brighter than halogens and might cause extra flaring and glare for on coming traffic.

The Ebay link does not provide a beam view against a wall showing how bright in what pattern it gives. Also doing this conversion is not DOT compliant.

I have personal experience with the Opt 7 LED bulbs.
What I like about them is the fact they are CanBUS-Ready and will work with any vehicle's computer system without error.
I'm waiting for a nice day and some time to do my conversion.
http://www.opt-7.com/fluxbeam-led-headlights/
 

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I was looking into LED headlights as well to replace the stock halogen headlights.

When i looked at the cost of decent ones, I just went to hids. Could buy 3 sets of hids for the same price as 1 led kit.

For those who don't care about price, I would love to see how the LED headlights turn out!!
 

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What do you think if this kit?

https://www.xenondepot.com/2017-impreza-h11-led-kit-p/30lz-0000-h11-led-kit.htm

Know of anything better or cheaper but still good?

Thanks!
Taken from their website:
"Our emitter arrays conform to the H11 halogen filament's position and orientation for maximum compatibility with the optics in a H11 halogen headlamp....you get 3673 lux (effective lumens)
They use Philips LumiLEDS LXZ2-5770 emitters for a natural-white 5700K color temperature.

Seeing those specs they look like they could work well. But they are pricey for the cause.
 

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IMO spending a bit extra here goes a long way since often its a product that will last you a long time. I have know people running the same kit for 5+ years, no issues. All they had to do was maintain the headlight lens to ensure flawless light output.
 

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Just thought I'd chime in here and share my experience with LED headlights. After 4 different kits and a total over $400, not a single one remains on my car. The reason is simple, look at a halogen bulb (while off, unless you want to blind yourself:p). The area from which the light originates, the filament, is a small narrow line. Now look at an LED headlight replacement, the light-producing surface area is much larger than a halogen filament, and typically only has two sides rather than infinite sides like a round bulb. The halogen light housing, whether projector or reflector, is designed to capture light from a halogen bulb, and therefore is focused on that one specific point where the filament is. Put an LED in there and while the overall amount of light produced may be more, the amount coming from the exact spot where the filament would reside is less, causing your headlights to lose intensity right in the center. This means the hot spot which provides the "punch" through darkness is no longer there, so distance is lost. Need proof? Here's some comparison pics from my 2015 Legacy. Though it has projector low beams, the results were the same with my reflector high beams and fogs.
Stock halogen, notice the bright spot in the center.


LED, while it may be bright notice the lack of intensity in the middle.


With different designs of LEDs you may be able to get a slightly better beam pattern than I did, but you will never achieve the same performance as a halogen bulb. If you want more light, look at PIAA NightTech. If it's whiter light you're after, Philips CrystalVision Ultra is what I run in my high beams and Hella 500FF driving lights. Color wise they're identical to factory HIDs. If that's not white enough, they have the DiamondVision which is the whitest halogen bulb I know of.

If you're willing to do a little work, the H11 to H9 mod for low beams, which I did on my brother's Impreza, will give you a 56% increase in raw lumen output. It can be done with just a file, but wire cutters and a dremel do speed up the process.

Here's a good comparison of bulbs:


So after wasting plenty of money away on LED headlights, my current setup is as follows:
Low beam: RX350 bi-xenon projector retrofit, Morimoto 4300k D2S bulbs
High beam: Philips CrystalVision Ultra
Fog light: Diode Dynamics Luxeon LED projector fogs https://www.diodedynamics.com/store/led-bulbs-1/assemblies.html
Hella 500: Philips CrystalVision Ultra

The LED fogs work fine as they're an entire replacement for the stock fog light housing. It's a sealed unit with 3 diodes and a parabolic lens designed specifically for those LEDs. There's nothing wrong with LEDs in automotive lighting when the optics are designed for them.

Hopefully some of you find this helpful and don't end up wasting money like I did:rolleyes:
 

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Nice post, Yes, and partly because an incandescent halogen gas filled bulb with a tungsten filament gives off a certain unidirectional light output. The reflectors grab the 360 degree light and focus it into a center location. This is the hot spot that is seen with the reflectors. As for the LED's they do not have a 360 degree or unidirectional light output and there for need prisms and mirrors to help focus and bend the light so it is able to be dispersed in a pattern best for driving. Also the luminous intensity of LED's are brighter in the light color spectrum of halogens and therefor produce more light than most reflectors are rated for. This causes the LED light to bounce around a jeweled reflector causing glare and splash of unfocused light leaving the housing. The other problem is filament location with in the housing. An LED must be proportionally equal to the filament that it will replace, most after market cheap LED's are not. Anything cheap an easy is just too difficult to achieve with normal reflectors.

However, there are LED's close to the filaments of incandescent halogens that could potentially work in reflector housings. They are pricey as they come with adjustments for tuning the LED die in the best location with in the housing to mimic the Halogen filament location.

It's either I spend 1600 bucks on the stock DRL housings, which aren't available for sale yet for the 2017. Or a spend 350 bucks on a stock fog light kit and put LED's in those, or a spend 120 bucks on adjustable LED's for the stock reflectors. Yeah this isn't going to be easy but I refuse to hang the white flag in defeat.
 

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There's another fog light option at subispeed.com
 

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After watching [link below] there's only 2 LED's bulbs I would buy currently. The GTR Lighting GEN 3 Ultra Series LED or the Supernova V.3 LED. They have the best light output and beam pattern (very, very important!!).

15 Brands LED Headlight Bulb Shoot-Out! Which one's the best?
 

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After watching [link below] there's only 2 LED's bulbs I would buy currently. The GTR Lighting GEN 3 Ultra Series LED or the Supernova V.3 LED. They have the best light output and beam pattern (very, very important!!).

15 Brands LED Headlight Bulb Shoot-Out! Which one's the best?
https://youtu.be/SQF5ESBHLrw
Now, that was educational!! That sure beats trial and error. Finding the best price is another question..
I'll make it easy for a cross comparison.
The GTR Lighting GEN 3 Ultra Series LED is $199
The Supernova V.3 LED is $139

For the sake of saving money, I might go for the Supernova, but I hate that heat sink design.


 

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Very informative video - thanks! Has anyone tried the GTR Lighting GEN 3 Ultra Series LED in a 2017/2018 Impreza?

There's a positive review for a 2017 Impreza with these $36 "BEAMTECH H11" LED bulbs on amazon. He's got some nice photos, but I'd love to see the beam pattern from a bit farther away - does it spread out?
 

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Just thought I'd chime in here and share my experience with LED headlights. After 4 different kits and a total over $400, not a single one remains on my car. The reason is simple, look at a halogen bulb (while off, unless you want to blind yourself:p). The area from which the light originates, the filament, is a small narrow line. Now look at an LED headlight replacement, the light-producing surface area is much larger than a halogen filament, and typically only has two sides rather than infinite sides like a round bulb. The halogen light housing, whether projector or reflector, is designed to capture light from a halogen bulb, and therefore is focused on that one specific point where the filament is. Put an LED in there and while the overall amount of light produced may be more, the amount coming from the exact spot where the filament would reside is less, causing your headlights to lose intensity right in the center. This means the hot spot which provides the "punch" through darkness is no longer there, so distance is lost. Need proof? Here's some comparison pics from my 2015 Legacy. Though it has projector low beams, the results were the same with my reflector high beams and fogs.
Stock halogen, notice the bright spot in the center.


LED, while it may be bright notice the lack of intensity in the middle.


With different designs of LEDs you may be able to get a slightly better beam pattern than I did, but you will never achieve the same performance as a halogen bulb. If you want more light, look at PIAA NightTech. If it's whiter light you're after, Philips CrystalVision Ultra is what I run in my high beams and Hella 500FF driving lights. Color wise they're identical to factory HIDs. If that's not white enough, they have the DiamondVision which is the whitest halogen bulb I know of.

If you're willing to do a little work, the H11 to H9 mod for low beams, which I did on my brother's Impreza, will give you a 56% increase in raw lumen output. It can be done with just a file, but wire cutters and a dremel do speed up the process.

Here's a good comparison of bulbs:


So after wasting plenty of money away on LED headlights, my current setup is as follows:
Low beam: RX350 bi-xenon projector retrofit, Morimoto 4300k D2S bulbs
High beam: Philips CrystalVision Ultra
Fog light: Diode Dynamics Luxeon LED projector fogs https://www.diodedynamics.com/store/led-bulbs-1/assemblies.html
Hella 500: Philips CrystalVision Ultra

The LED fogs work fine as they're an entire replacement for the stock fog light housing. It's a sealed unit with 3 diodes and a parabolic lens designed specifically for those LEDs. There's nothing wrong with LEDs in automotive lighting when the optics are designed for them.

Hopefully some of you find this helpful and don't end up wasting money like I did:rolleyes:
This is a FANTASTIC post. Full of GOOD information.
 

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After watching [link below] there's only 2 LED's bulbs I would buy currently. The GTR Lighting GEN 3 Ultra Series LED or the Supernova V.3 LED. They have the best light output and beam pattern (very, very important!!).

15 Brands LED Headlight Bulb Shoot-Out! Which one's the best?
https://youtu.be/SQF5ESBHLrw
30 minutes of my life that were very well spent. Entertaining and educational (and nice guns too). GREAT find!!!
 

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Very informative video - thanks! Has anyone tried the GTR Lighting GEN 3 Ultra Series LED in a 2017/2018 Impreza?

There's a positive review for a 2017 Impreza with these $36 "BEAMTECH H11" LED bulbs on amazon. He's got some nice photos, but I'd love to see the beam pattern from a bit farther away - does it spread out?
off of the positive feedback and reviews of the Beamtech H11 LED bulbs i too bought 2 pair of them. one for my wife's Impreza Sport and one for my Crosstrek. i will admit, they have a very definitive "cut off" point but they are FAR better than stock. the "spread" on the Beamtech bulb is incredible actually. my wife has hard time seeing when it is dark out. the morning after i installed her bulbs she drove to work in the dark and texted me once she got to work to thank me for switching her lights. i don't have pics or know the correct terminology to describe it. but i will say this, i have also been a fan of Sylvania SilverStar Ultra bulbs and ran them on her car and mine up until i just switched them for the Beamtechs. but i will not run them again! they are more expensive than the Beamtech LED bulbs and no where near as good in my opinion. for $36 a pair i was more than pleasantly surprised. if they last a year, i will replace them with the same thing in a heartbeat.

i watched that 30 min video twice before buying LED bulbs and almost even talked myself out of it. then i remembered something my Dad taught me years ago when modding a vehicle. one man's experience may not be the same as yours. the review was great but ultimately the reviewer is trying to sell bulbs, so it's no wonder the most expensive bulb won "their" review. i am not saying there isn't a better bulb out there, because i am sure there is. and i may even try a more expensive bulb in the future. but if it don't perform as well as my $36 Beamtech bulbs i will send them back and stick with what i have.
 
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Light Qualities

Being a teacher is hard to turn off, forgive me...

Watt = equals a quantity of energy being consumed or generated.
Lumen = quantity of light—bright or dim
Kelvin or temperature = color of light—usually expressed as degrees Kelvin, eg, 4200K
Light = a bit of a paradox—an energy wave that acts like a particle beam; a particle beam that acts like an energy wave; simultaneously. Or why solar panels work.

Our eyesight evolved to conduct daylight. There is light that we can not see, at either end of our visible spectrum, that other creatures can. Halogen lamps glow at temperatures between 3500K and 4200K. It is possible to have 4200K lamps—the formal name for bulbs—that have 5000 Lumens or 1000 lumens.

It is not uncommon for lamps with high Kelvin number 5600K to be thought of as brighter, they are not. High Kelvin numbers mean more 'visible' light,' not more lumens.

In the late '80's the Federal Vehicle code moved from a specification standard to a performance standard. That is why we have aerodynamically shaped headlights. Initially, those performance standards were rated at watts for brightness. As lighting technology evolved those laws were amended to quantify brightness in lumens. There is a limit to how many lumens your headlights may have so they do not blind oncoming drivers.
 
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