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2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm a High School Senior from Ohio who drives a 2019 Impreza 2.0i sport, and although I can't exactly work on my car because my parents got me a warranty, I still want to learn how to work on my current car.

I used to drive a 2010 Hybrid Camry which got pretty amazing gas mileage, but it was not the safest to drive for someone who was new to driving a car. I got in two crashes with said car, and after the grounded period of over half a year was finished, I swore never to drive that thing again. It may have had nice amenities, such as leather seats and a sunroof, and yes, it had amazing gas mileage, but I did not feel safe driving the car, and did not perform well enough during the winter.

When my dad bought his Subaru Outback, I really liked the car better than the others my dad had chosen in the past. Both my parents were impressed that I had lasted at a job at McDonald's during the school year, (as I took more honors classes, as well as a double math course load (two math classes taken simultaneously in the same year)), and were willing to aid me with the money I had saved thus far to help me buy a safer car for the winter. I was hesitant at first, but eventually after many test drives of the car, awd and a car that felt like a car, not a bland, expensive device to get you from point a to point b somehow. The traction was reassuring, the steering far lighter and more responsive, it was smaller, yet had a pretty large trunk, and still had lots of room. I liked it so much that after a month my father bought the car, which is now the current car I have, the Impreza.

Right now, I am going into my senior year in High School, and I plan to be a Mechanical Engineering major in college. Because I have found that I am a car enthusiast, but never have joined the car community, I thought I should start here, and also get advice on how to do work on my car from people with more experience. I have obtained some of the tools needed so far, such as a socket wrench set I purchased for my birthday.

Here is my clean car, (which gets dirty quickly as I have to park outside the garage under near my neighbor's tree):
(unfortunately, pictures will need to be sourced off my reddit post, as pics off my phone will not transfer to the computer, so I will leave you this post with my car pictures):

My car (cleaned):
 

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2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Does your high school have a shop class?

Also I know our local community college had an introduction to automotive class.

Those might be two good places to start.
I mean, I have tried in a sense, as there is the local college, UNOH, which specializes in the Automotive, Diesel, and High Performance industries (sourced off here: About UNOH | UNOH). I have not graduated high school, but as a requirement to take classes at UNOH, I need to have graduated, and there seems to be no exception for someone like me (with a solid 3.7 GPA and an ACT score in math of a 31), I could not take classes until next summer. Our high school may have a shop class, but as I am taking college classes, (that my high school funds), and one of these college classes I will start in late August is Fundamentals of Engineering I, which takes place at the Ford Plant near my college campus.
 

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2018 Impreza Limited
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The way I got into working on my car was I had a friend show me a couple of things, and then I just watched tons of youtube videos from guys like chrisfix, and engineering explained, and mr. subaru. I started with basic oil changes, then learned to do brake pads. Then stepped up to more serious services, like CVT drain and refill. And then jumped off the deep end, and started modifying. I think just doing maintinace is a good way to get some confidence working on your car. I'm at 68k, and never taken the car to a mechanic besides getting the recalls fixed by subaru.
 

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2018 Impreza Limited
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If your going to do oil changes, please, get your self a fumo oil quick drain valve to replace your bolt oil pan drain with. Makes oil changes so much easier, especially since the oil drain bolt is at like a 45 degree angle facing the rear of the car. I stripped it out once cause it's not the easiest to see either.
 

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Hi, I'm a High School Senior from Ohio who drives a 2019 Impreza 2.0i sport, and although I can't exactly work on my car because my parents got me a warranty, I still want to learn how to work on my current car.

I used to drive a 2010 Hybrid Camry which got pretty amazing gas mileage, but it was not the safest to drive for someone who was new to driving a car. I got in two crashes with said car, and after the grounded period of over half a year was finished, I swore never to drive that thing again. It may have had nice amenities, such as leather seats and a sunroof, and yes, it had amazing gas mileage, but I did not feel safe driving the car, and did not perform well enough during the winter.

When my dad bought his Subaru Outback, I really liked the car better than the others my dad had chosen in the past. Both my parents were impressed that I had lasted at a job at McDonald's during the school year, (as I took more honors classes, as well as a double math course load (two math classes taken simultaneously in the same year)), and were willing to aid me with the money I had saved thus far to help me buy a safer car for the winter. I was hesitant at first, but eventually after many test drives of the car, awd and a car that felt like a car, not a bland, expensive device to get you from point a to point b somehow. The traction was reassuring, the steering far lighter and more responsive, it was smaller, yet had a pretty large trunk, and still had lots of room. I liked it so much that after a month my father bought the car, which is now the current car I have, the Impreza.

Right now, I am going into my senior year in High School, and I plan to be a Mechanical Engineering major in college. Because I have found that I am a car enthusiast, but never have joined the car community, I thought I should start here, and also get advice on how to do work on my car from people with more experience. I have obtained some of the tools needed so far, such as a socket wrench set I purchased for my birthday.

Here is my clean car, (which gets dirty quickly as I have to park outside the garage under near my neighbor's tree):
(unfortunately, pictures will need to be sourced off my reddit post, as pics off my phone will not transfer to the computer, so I will leave you this post with my car pictures):

My car (cleaned):
Definetly go to scrap yards and just mess with the cars take parts off see how stuff works, just be respectful dont damage anything that someone else might be looking for but its a great way to learn alot without worrying about damaging your own car, also learn how to install parts yourself and just look up how to install vids those help alot.
 

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Absolutely enjoy the time looking up repair videos, any kind of car videos. There is an endless amount out there just on YouTube. If there is anything you want to ask about your Impreza, someone here will help you out, especially on the repair side.
 

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Entering my sophomore year of college, we have a very similar build. Same color but I started with the base version.

Added the spoiler, new wheels, a nameless exhaust with a 5" muffler, blacked out the grill, added the front lip and tinted it. All work done by me.
Car Wheel Land vehicle Sky Vehicle
 

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Mechanical engineering is a good carreer path. There are many avenues to follow based on your preferences. I included electronics, computers and software-development into my skillset.

Surprisingly, a lot of vehicle diagnostics is simply computer-aided electronics troubleshooting. One must understand how an engine combines air/fuel and burns it. Other helpfull skills are mechanical aptitude and some hydraulics. At some point, an understanding of how an AC refrigeration cycle works.

Two HIGHLY regarded uTube channels regarding car-repair:
 

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this was the first car i worked on, honestly youtube tutorials, wrx and xv are very similar cars to work on so the tutorials are similar to what it would be on an imprez. and if you have a friend thats has experience, inv him or her to help, and itll make it super easy to learn.
 

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Watching Mr Subaru really made me more acquainted with my Impreza. Since basically all Subarus are related in some ways, one manual transmission service video on a Subaru Legacy can still be referenced to doing the same service on the Impreza. Yes, Mr Subaru is a high recommendation for any Subaru owner.
 

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2019 Subaru Impreza 2.0i Sport
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Entering my sophomore year of college, we have a very similar build. Same color but I started with the base version.

Added the spoiler, new wheels, a nameless exhaust with a 5" muffler, blacked out the grill, added the front lip and tinted it. All work done by me.
View attachment 28261
So how did you change those fog lights out? mine are rectangular bars, and are too dim, so I would like to replace mine. I found this link, but as I have the sport model, is it still ok to buy this or should I just get fog lights that clip directly onto the grill?
Subaru OEM Fog Light Kit 2017-2019 Impreza 4D & 5D (Non Sport Models)

Car Grille Automotive lighting Hood Vehicle
 

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Hi, I'm a High School Senior from Ohio who drives a 2019 Impreza 2.0i sport, and although I can't exactly work on my car because my parents got me a warranty, I still want to learn how to work on my current car.

I thought I should start here, and also get advice on how to do work on my car from people with more experience.
I think just doing maintinace is a good way to get some confidence working on your car.
My Subaru dealer charges $2,638.25 for 10 visits over first 60,000 miles. Although they do a lot of inspections, these 30 maintenance tasks are all that are included for that price
  • 10 oil filter and oil change (@ 6000 miles)
  • 10 tire rotations (@ 6000 miles)
  • 5 cabin filter (@ 12000 miles)
  • 2 air filter (@ 30000 miles)
  • 2 flush brakes (@ 30000 miles)
  • 1 change spark plugs (@ 60000 miles)

I think you should start with your filter replacements. They won't void your warranty, but you may find out how tricky some of these simple tasks can be.
1) Subaru Impreza Cabin Air Filter Replacement
2) How To Replace The Engine Air Filter In A Subaru
3) How to change the Engine Oil and Filter, Subaru Impreza
4) 2012 Subaru Impreza Tire Rotation

The last two tasks (a) flush brakes and (b)change spark plugs can be much trickier. Subaru's boxer engine makes changing spark plugs more difficult than the standard inline engine.

In any case these are the core six maintenance tasks. If you can rotate tires then you can replace tires. Also learn how to change your battery and don't drive more than 60,000 miles on a battery or more than 6 years. It's better to replace a battery than have one fail when you most need it.
 

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2022 Sport 5-Door
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So how did you change those fog lights out? mine are rectangular bars, and are too dim, so I would like to replace mine. I found this link, but as I have the sport model, is it still ok to buy this or should I just get fog lights that clip directly onto the grill?
Subaru OEM Fog Light Kit 2017-2019 Impreza 4D & 5D (Non Sport Models)

image.jpg
Sport trim vehicles require adding the harness, relay, and switch for fog lights in order to swap out your DRLs for them. Those light bars on the front are just the running lights.
Rather than install fully separate fog lights and the wiring for such, I opted for the OLM Night Harness instead. They output a decent enough amount of light at night, but obviously are not designed to be fog lights. Essentially you'll be doing the same amount of work if you run aftermarket fogs, or OEM fogs. Both will need wiring, and both will need the switches - OEM would have the benefit of utilizing the factory mounting location.
 

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2019 Subaru Impreza Sport 5 Dr. Manual Shift
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So how did you change those fog lights out? mine are rectangular bars, and are too dim, so I would like to replace mine. I found this link, but as I have the sport model, is it still ok to buy this or should I just get fog lights that clip directly onto the grill?
Subaru OEM Fog Light Kit 2017-2019 Impreza 4D & 5D (Non Sport Models)
Since you have the sport, you don't have fog lights (weird I know) those are DRL's instead. Unfortunately, unlike other models, the wiring isn't' there for fogs on a sport. Every other model it's pretty much plug and play. I have a sport and this is what I did.

Diode Dynamic Fog Light Install 2019 Impreza Sport

I use to be very active on the Scoobymods website which is a how to for Subaru mods. A while ago someone bought the site and it sort of went south and I stopped contributing. There is still a lot of general info and many of the things are similar. I do have some stuff that I've done on my google pics so if you click my sig you can see somethings. If you have any specific questions DM me.

Between YouTube (Mr Subaru is great), forums like this and google you should be able to teach yourself quite a bit. Keep in mind you don't always have to buy specialized tools, many car parts places have a tool lending program. AutoZone will lend you things. You leave a refundable deposit and they will let you borrow stuff. You get all the money back when you return the tool.

~peaty
 

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I was in more or less the same situation about 45 years ago; Born into a family with no gearheads, but wanting to learn. And, let me tell you, the best way to learn how to fix your own car is to buy an old, unreliable car. I got my start with 2 of the most clapped-out VW Beetles, quickly moved on to a ratty Ford Maverick, a Chevy Chevelle, a Ford F100 pickup. and then, eventually a Honda Civic that was actually fairly new and in decent shape. But, man, I learned how to do brakes, exhaust, tie-rods, oil changes, even how to drop the engine and replace the transmission in my Beetle.

Sadly, cars are much more reliable today. No need to file breaker points or overhaul carburetors any more. Spark plugs even last 60k now! Brake work is about the only 'repairs' I even do today. I still have old repair manuals left from the old days; Chilton guides for American cars, Haynes manuals for the foreign cars I owned, and my favorite of all, the book "How to fix your VW; a guide for the Compleat Idiot", which was probably the best repair manual ever written. See if you can find a copy of that; it will show you a lot of obsolete repairs that nobody does anymore (like how to change an inner tube on a tube-style tire), but it a very entertaining read. Don't pay too much attention to the specifics (unless you decide to buy an old air-cooled VW), but read the basics, the things that still matter, like how to buy and use tools, etc.

If you are going to study Mech E at university, you will quickly find a large community of experienced gearheads with the faculty as well as the students, many of which will have extensive tool boxes, and lots of experience. Also, extracurricular groups such as Formula SAE can give you a lot of experience (it did for me..).
 
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