5th Gen Subaru Impreza Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The Impreza was created in 1993 as a 4 speed (i.e. with overdrive) to replace the 3 speed Loyale. It began with 110 hp which was a less powerful cousin to the 130 hp Legacy (3 years older). Within two years the Impreza could optionally be purchased with the same 135 hp engine as the Legacy. The Legacy was always assembled in Indiana, but the Impreza was assembled in Japan until the 5th generation when Imprezas destined for North America moved to the Indiana plant.

Many of us think the current 2.0 liter 152 hp engine will eventually be dumped for a more powerful, possibly hybrid engine. But is there any chance that the concerns about climate will revive the 110 hp to 135 hp engine size that the Impreza began with?

These were the average horsepower numbers of the Asian brands from 1975 to 1990 (excluding Isuzu and Suzuki). Subaru did not surpass 100 hp until they began to manufacture cars in Indiana.

The first-generation Honda Accord was launched on 7 May 1976, while the second generation debuted on 22 September 1981. Honda began production in Marysville Ohio in November 1982, but that was more to avoid political backlash against Honda as it began to threaten Domestic automakers. The Plaza Accord was in 1985 when the world's central bankers decided to interfere in the foreign currency market with the goal of making the USD considerably weaker against the Deutsche Mark, the Great British Pound, and the Japanese Yen. By the late 1980s all the Japanese automakers had to move much of their production to Northern America simply because the JPY was too strong to make a profit by manufacturing in Japan. Acura was founded on 27 March 1986, Lexus was Founded in 1989, Infiniti on November 8, 1989.

Horsepower had to increase as they were no longer producing just budget vehicles.
NissanToyotaMazdaYearHondaSubaruHyundai
138124115199012111689
11311410619891108875
10010810719881059068
102107951987939068
106101931986908868
103968519858486-
101918119848473-
91888219837473-
90847819827171-
90797619817170-
84817819806868-
86839119796467-
106855519786367-
106828119776265-
1078711419765661-
1129011519755458-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Wow, hard to imagine Toyota was producing more HP than Honda.
Do you think Toyota just intuitively built beefier, solid engines while Honda was building economical engines until they figured out how to improve their engine performance?

The reason I say this is because my sister’s Camry has a naturally aspirated beefy 2.5 L and gets racking fuel economy around 35 mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
In May 1981, with the American auto industry mired in recession, Japanese car makers agreed to limit exports of passenger cars to the United States. This “voluntary export restraint” (VER) program, allowed only 1.68 million Japanese cars into the U.S. each year. The cap was raised to 1.85 million cars in 1984, and to 2.30 million in 1985, before the program was terminated in 1994.

One key long-run consequence of the VER program stems from the provision that any Japanese cars produced in the U.S. were excluded from the limits. Beginning with Honda’s Marysville, Ohio, plant in 1982, Japanese makers responded to this provision by investing heavily in U.S. production facilities. By 1990, Nissan, Toyota, Mazda, and Mitsubishi had joined Honda in producing substantial numbers of cars in America. That entry, combined with the recession of 1991, was sufficient to eliminate the effects of the restraints after 1990.
This author implies that the VER program was chiefly responsible for Japanese automakers setting up production facilities in the US. Personally, I think it was more because of the Plaza Accord. The Plaza Accord was a Sept 22, 1985 agreement among the G-5 nations of France, Germany, the U.K., the U.S., and Japan. The goal of the Plaza Accord was to weaken the U.S. dollar in order to reduce the mounting U.S. trade deficit. Prior to the late 1990s Japanese automakers could produce the type of vehicle they had been making in Japan since WWII cheaply in Japan, and sell in the US for a huge profit. When the exchange rate changed so radically they were forced to hire US labor and make more expensive vehicles in the US. Of course, the end result of the radical changes in exchange rate was The Lost Decade (失われた10年, Ushinawareta Jūnen). The Lost Decade was a period of economic stagnation in Japan caused by the asset price bubble's collapse in late 1991.

Post WWII Japan began making very small displacement vehicles. Their urban areas were so dense that most driving was done at speeds of less than 25 mph and gasoline was expensive. Tax incentives were offered to automakers who produced "kei" cars that could lure people off motor scooters. In the US, the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1952 authorized the first funding for an Interstate Highway system, so demand was high for larger vehicles.

Ecoregion Rectangle Slope Plot Font


The VER program of the 1980s was a disaster for the American Consumer. With the JPY/USD exchange rate presently at a 25 year low, and the federal government essentially repeating the VER program by requiring EVs to be assembled in the US in order for consumers to qualify for tax incentives we may be repeating history. If all foreign automakers move EV production to the US, it is possible that we are resuming the policies of the 1980s that resulted in General Motors decade-long decline in market share.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
Do you think Toyota just intuitively built beefier, solid engines while Honda was building economical engines until they figured out how to improve their engine performance?

The reason I say this is because my sister’s Camry has a naturally aspirated beefy 2.5 L and gets racking fuel economy around 35 mpg.
Looks like Honda invented VTEC in 1989, that's when their engines started becoming more powerful and efficient.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Heh. My first Subie was a 1988 Justy hatchback. So small, it looked like a Yugo (for those who remember). It had a 3-cylinder engine and maybe 75 hp if I'm being generous. Oh, but I could make it fly with the 4-speed manual transmission, because the car was so small it weighed practically nothing.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top